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Heatwave UK: The surprising drink found to help cool you down – study

MET Office: Mercury to hit 27 on Friday as heatwave continues

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The research establishing this fact was carried out by Ollie Jaw of the University of Ottawa’s School of Human Kinetics.

They found drinking hot drinks such as tea can cool the body down as it results “in a lower amount of heat stored inside your body”.

It was cautioned that this only works if the person is in a place where the sweat has the opportunity to evaporate.

If it doesn’t then the method won’t be as effective.

Jay added: “On a very hot and humid day, if you’re wearing a lot of clothing, or if you’re having so much sweat that it starts to drip on the round and doesn’t evaporate from the skin’s surface, then drinking a hot drink is a bad thing.”

Nevertheless, this study shows that drinking a hot drink on a hot day is not an ineffective act to undertake.

The results come at a time when the UK is over halfway through the second week of a heatwave, one which has seen temperatures regularly rise over 30 degrees.

With the peak set to come on Monday, many are looking for ways to cope with the heat.

Are there any dangers to being outside this weekend?

Although many will be looking to just get through the heatwave, many are relishing the hot weather and looking to get outside and enjoy it to the max.

However, there are dangers to this.

Extended time in hot weather increases the risk of heat exhaustion and heatstroke.

Both of these conditions occur after prolonged time in hot weather without adequate hydration.

Heat exhaustion normally comes before heatstroke.

Symptoms to look out for include:
• A headache
• Dizziness and confusion
• Loss of appetite
• Feeling sick
• Excessive sweating
• Pale and clammy skin
• Arm cramps
• Leg cramps
• Stomach cramps
• Fast breathing and pulse
• A high temperature of 38C or above
• Being very thirsty.

What can you do to help someone suffering from heat exhaustion?

The NHS recommends moving a person experiencing symptoms to a cool place and getting them to lie down with their feet slightly raised.

After this they say it is essential to get them to drink plenty of water and to cool their skin with cool water or a fan.

If all this is done, the NHS say they should start to feel better after around 30 minutes.

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